Friday, March 3, 2017

7 Books I Own and Have Yet to Read


It's not exactly a secret around here that I'm a pretty big bookworm. I post monthly reading recaps, participate in blogger reading challenges and legitimately have my 14-digit library card number memorized so that I can request books online. I have a weird habit, though. I don't read any of the books on my shelf. 99% of the books I read are library-borrowed, so the books that I do own sit on my shelf, looking pretty and collecting dust.

This is just a small sample of those books I've owned for ages, but have yet to read:
The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan | I am a completely fanatic about food and learning about food systems. It feels like I've read so many scholarly books about the merits of vegan/vegetarianism, about how our food system is destroying the environment, about what food systems look like cross-culturally. The list goes on. So it's completely bizarre that I have yet to read anything written by esteemed food writer, Michael Pollan. This one needs to go to the top of my list, stat!
Shrill by Lindy West | I received this book when I hosted a few girlfriends at my house before Christmas for a book and cookie exchange. I don't necessarily consider myself a "shrill" person, but I'm curious to read about a woman finding her voice and how women's voices are perceived simply because of their womanhood.







Unstoppable by Bill Nye | I admit that for someone who strives to live "green" and eco-consciously, I know next to nothing about climate change. Science has never been my strong suit, but after I listened to Bill Nye's audiobook Undeniable, I came away being completely rocked by my new scientific knowledge on evolution. I may not understand much scientific theory, but I am passionate about taking care of Creation and there's no one better than Bill Nye to explain climate change to a layman like me.






The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith | This book has sat largely untouched simply because crime fiction is not a genre that I frequent. But because it's J.K. Rowling, I'm curious. If I ever decide to break out of my comfort zone, this will be the first one I choose.








The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls | I think I just grabbed this one off the thrift store shelf one day because people kept telling me how good it was. I've heard rave reviews from readers and non-readers alike who have said what a powerful memoir this is.







Truth and Beauty by Ann Patchett | Perhaps my two favorite authors in the world are Glennon Doyle Melton (Love Warrior) and Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat Pray Love). Both women have mentioned how much they admire Ann Patchett as an author, and as a person. I can hardly think of two women whose opinions I value more, so when I saw this book at a Half Price Books sale, I immediately snatched it up.







American Gods by Neil Gaiman | This was another thrift-store find. Usually, I like to dwell in lighthearted books and nonfiction, so Neil Gaiman isn't someone I would typically gravitate toward. However, I was so delighted by his writing in The Graveyard Book that I wanted to find other books written by him. I read that it was being turned into a TV series which intrigued me even more, so I'd like to read this before it comes out.

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Have you read any of these books? Should I keep them on my to-read list or donate them?

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